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Yankees force Game 5; Dodgers, Astros, Braves move on

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We had four elimination games on Thursday, and three teams were sent packing. The Los Angeles Dodgers finished off the San Diego Padres, the Atlanta Braves completed a sweep of the Miami Marlins and the Houston Astros eliminated the Oakland Athletics. That leaves the New York Yankees, who stayed alive by beating the Tampa Bay Rays to force a winner-take-all Game 5 on Friday night.

Here are the stars, turning points and takeaways from each of Thursday’s games.

Key links: Ranking the remaining teams | Guide to bubble ballparks | Schedule, bracket

Jump to: NYY-TB | SD-LAD | HOU-OAK | MIA-ATL

New York Yankees 5, Tampa Bay Rays 1

What it means: The Yankees outdid the bullpen experts to force a decisive Game 5 in the American League Division Series in San Diego. New York put together one of its more complete games of the postseason, holding the Rays’ bats at bay, allowing only three hits and taking advantage of the few opportunities Tampa Bay’s elite arms allowed. Left-hander Jordan Montgomery was able to wiggle in and out of trouble through four innings of work, allowing just one run. From there, the Yankees’ bullpen, which has been suspect at times, worked like clockwork: Chad Green, Zack Britton and Aroldis Chapman combined for five hitless innings with Kyle Higashioka once again behind the dish, having earned the starting job over the struggling Gary Sanchez.

Southern California’s marine layer, a stiff breeze that kicked up for Game 4, tried to push back any ball threatening to leave Petco Park, but massive swings by Luke Voit (a solo shot in the second) and Gleyber Torres (a two-run blow in the sixth) accounted for three of the Yankees’ five runs.

All of the Yankees’ relievers threw fewer than 25 pitches, which will be an advantage for their pen, as it will be all hands on deck for Game 5 on Friday night. Gerrit Cole will start on short rest for the first time in his career. — Marly Rivera

Next up: Game 5, with a spot in the American League Championship Series on the line, Friday night in San Diego.

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Will Smith sets a Dodgers record and becomes the first catcher in major league history with five hits in a postseason game, helping L.A. to eliminate the Padres.

Los Angeles Dodgers 12, San Diego Padres 3

What it means: This will not be the last time the Dodgers and Padres play a meaningful game in the near future. While the Dodgers on Thursday reiterated in the postseason what they had demonstrated during the regular season — that they are a better team — their 12-3 victory that cinched a division-series sweep felt like a prelude for things bigger and better on both sides.

To the Padres, it marked the end of their foray back into competitiveness, and with young talent dotting the roster and still filling the minor leagues, there should be a day soon enough that the gap between them and the Dodgers isn’t as large as this series exposed.

And yet as the Dodgers’ offensive output against a train of Padres pitchers in Game 3 illustrated, this L.A. team is so good, so instantaneously dangerous, that its greatest weakness — a questionable closer — might not even be necessary because of how easily they can score runs. Twelve of them on zero home runs is anomalous in 2020 — and it’s just what the Dodgers can do. A playoff-record five hits from catcher Will Smith registers similarly: On any given night, there are a half-dozen hitters in Los Angeles’ lineup every bit as good as him. — Jeff Passan

Next up: For the Dodgers, a National League Championship Series date with the Braves, the only other team left in the playoffs that hasn’t lost a postseason game yet. For the Padres, some questions to answer after a season that despite their loss was a big success.

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Carlos Correa drives in five runs as the Astros dominate the A’s 11-6 in Game 4 of the ALDS.

Houston Astros 11, Oakland Athletics 6

What it means: The Astros didn’t possess the pitching depth to match the A’s going into this series. Their path to victory was obvious: They needed to hit like the Astros of old. And they did just that. A decorated lineup that languished through the shortened season finally came to life at Dodger Stadium, which consistently provided warm day games that favored the hitters.

Carlos Correa, George Springer and Michael Brantley each provided multihomer performances during the series, and the Astros amassed 33 runs in four games. Eleven of those runs, on 14 hits, came in the Game 4 clincher, with Correa going 3-for-4 with five RBIs and one 427-foot home run. The dagger was provided by Jose Altuve, who struggled mightily during the regular season but crushed a 428-foot home run to straightaway center field in the seventh, his sixth hit in 15 at-bats this series.

The Astros will have their challenges in the next round, a seven-game series with no off days in between. Zack Greinke, who gutted through 14 outs in Game 4, is clearly not right. The rest of the rotation is nowhere near as accomplished. And the bullpen is composed of young pitchers who were mainly starters in the minor leagues. But those are problems for another day. The Astros — hated by most of America after the sign-stealing scandal and clearly determined not to care — are heading to their fourth consecutive ALCS. — Alden Gonzalez

Next up: The Astros will open the ALCS on Sunday in San Diego against either the Rays or the Yankees. The A’s, meanwhile, begin their offseason with some questions to answer.

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Ronald Acuna Jr. is feeling good about the Braves’ large lead in Game 3 of the NLDS vs. the Marlins.

Atlanta Braves 7, Miami Marlins 0

What it means: The gap between even two disparately matched teams doesn’t always show up in a short series, but it sure did in this one. The Braves throttled the underdog Marlins in every way imaginable. Atlanta got airtight pitching, timely defense and an offense that kept the scoreboard clicking both with and without home runs.

The Marlins did not look ready for prime time, which really should have surprised no one. They were a 31-29 team that was outscored by 41 runs during the season. Miami has more work left ahead of it in its quest to construct a perennial winner. Still, from overcoming an early-season COVID-19 outbreak to rarely seeing their home ballpark in the opening weeks of the campaign, the Marlins overcame a lot to get this far. Better days lie ahead, and establishing an organizational identity as one of resilience is not nothing for a franchise that has for so long lacked an identity of any sort. Kudos to Don Mattingly and his squad.

Now Atlanta will move up in class after polishing off Cincinnati and Miami without breaking a sweat. By eliminating the Marlins in three games, now the Braves can make the short trip from Houston to Arlington, Texas, and enjoy three days off before the NLCS begins Monday. Thus, manager Brian Snitker and his staff can set up their pitching plan however they see fit. The Dodgers present a considerably more formidable test for Atlanta, but so far, the Braves appear to be more than ready for it. — Bradford Doolittle

Next up: Atlanta’s NLCS matchup with Los Angeles will begin Monday night in Arlington. Miami heads into the offseason with questions to answer after a surprising run has come to an end.

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Hamilton questions FIA’s choice of Petrov as a steward

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Six-time world champion Lewis Hamilton has questioned the FIA’s decision to employ Vitaly Petrov as a steward at this weekend’s Portuguese Grand Prix after the Russian recently made controversial remarks about Hamilton’s anti-racism stance.

Following the Tuscan Grand Prix, at which Hamilton wore a T-shirt saying “arrest the cops who killed Breonna Taylor”, Petrov claimed the world champion had gone “too far” and likened it to “urging everyone to be gay” if a driver came out as homosexual.

Taylor, a Black woman, was fatally shot March 13 when police officers burst into her Louisville, Kentucky, apartment using a no-knock warrant during a narcotics investigation. She was 26.

Hamilton’s shirt at the Tuscan Grand Prix read: “arrest the cops who killed Breonna Taylor” on the front and “say her name” alongside her picture on the back. He wore it at F1’s pre-race anti-racism demonstration and again on the podium after winning the race.

Speaking ahead of the following round of the championship in Petrov’s native Russia, the former Lotus and Caterham F1 driver was quoted as saying: “In Russia we have a different mentality, and we do not have the problems that Hamilton is talking about. There should be respect for everyone.”

He added: “For me, this t-shirt, on top of calling for everyone to kneel, was too much.

“It is a personal matter for every adult. You have the right to speak out on social media or give interviews, but I think the US government is well aware of these problems already.

“But to call on that in Formula One itself… I think half of the spectators didn’t even know what the shirt was about until it was explained to them.

“And let’s say a driver admits to being gay — will they come out with a rainbow flag and urge everyone to become gay as well? I think the FIA will no longer allow such behaviours.”

When Petrov’s comments were relayed to Hamilton during a press conference on Thursday in Portugal, the world champion questioned why the FIA had chosen Petrov as a steward over other former drivers who would also be suitable for the role.

“I mean, I’ve not seen all of the quotes, but obviously you’ve just recited some of them so yes of course I would say that’s a surprise that they would be hiring someone that has those beliefs and is so vocal about things that we’re trying to fight against,” Hamilton said. “So you should take it up with them [the FIA] really, there’s nothing that I can particularly do about it.

“But we should definitely be including people here who are with the times, who are understanding of the times that we are living in and sensitive to the matters that are surrounding us.

“So I don’t really understand what their goal is or why particularly he’s here because it’s not like they don’t have any other good options.”

Petrov, who competed in 58 grands prix during his F1 career, is one of four stewards who will officiate at this weekend’s Portuguese Grand Prix.

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Champions League’s ultimate sleepers: RB Leipzig to win, Inter Milan to reach final, Sevilla to semis

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The Champions League began on Tuesday and if we’re being honest, we know who’s probably going to win. Through one-sixth of the group stage, FiveThirtyEight gives defending champion Bayern Munich a 26 percent chance of repeating, followed by Manchester City (15 percent), Barcelona (9 percent), Liverpool (8 percent) and PSG (8 percent). PSG’s odds sank by three percentage points after an upset loss to Manchester United, though, and Real Madrid sank from 6 percent to 4 percent following a jarring 3-2 home loss to Shakhtar Donetsk.

Bayern more than looked the part of a favourite in Wednesday’s 4-0 destruction of Atletico Madrid, but with two of what were considered the “top six favourites” losing, there’s a lot of space for lower-tier contenders to advance pretty far in the draw. Besides, all but the chalkiest of tournaments produce surprises. Tottenham Hotspur made it to the final in 2019, while RB Leipzig, Lyon, Ajax, Roma and Monaco have all made somewhat unexpected runs to the semifinals in the past four years.

There are twists and turns along the way, so with that in mind, let’s talk about some teams that could be responsible for some major twists to come.

The term “sleeper” can mean a lot of different things — sleeper to win the whole thing? sleeper to advance out of the group stage? — so let’s talk about teams that fit each possible definition. It might not be likely that these teams will win the title, but they’re more than capable of either knocking out your favourite team or becoming your favourite team in the months ahead.

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Sleeper to win the whole thing

RB Leipzig

Group: H
Title odds, per FiveThirtyEight: 4 percent
First match: beat Istanbul Basaksehir, 2-0
Next match: at Manchester United (Oct. 28)

Despite reaching the Champions League semis in August, Julian Nagelsmann’s squad were stuck in Pot 3, but thanks to United’s upset of PSG, FiveThirtyEight now gives the Red Bull-owned squad a better chance of advancing (63 percent) than PSG (62 percent). A win in Manchester next Wednesday would put them in perfect position to win their group.

The absence of former star Timo Werner, now with Chelsea, is likely hurting RBL’s odds, but they’ve shown no sign of slippage without him, beginning the Bundesliga season with 10 points from four matches. They controlled Basaksehir from the opening kick and got to ease off the throttle pretty quickly.

RBL is attacking from everywhere. In five league and cup matches, seven different players have scored and 16 have logged either a key pass or an assist. Midfielder Angelino (four goals) and forward Yussuf Poulsen (three) are thriving, and the team has only gotten 45 minutes out of injured winger and captain Marcel Sabitzer thus far. We’ll see if he’s ready for the trip to Manchester, but RBL are again proving themselves worthy of big-boy status.

Sleeper to reach the final

Inter Milan

Group: B
Odds of reaching the final, per FiveThirtyEight: 6 percent
First match: drew with Borussia Monchengladbach, 2-2
Next match: at Shakhtar Donetsk (Oct. 27)

Antonio Conte and Inter could not take full advantage of Real Madrid’s defeat, drawing with Gladbach despite creating a 3.5-1.5 xG advantage. It was unlucky, but it was also reaffirmation that this team is fun as hell.

Inter nearly won Serie A last year and have almost inarguably performed better than either Juventus or Barcelona — two teams with far stronger betting odds — since the coronavirus restart this summer. Their only losses in the last three months were to Sevilla in the Europa League final and to a torrid AC Milan this past Saturday.

They kept most of last year’s squad intact and added both full-back Achraf Hakimi and veteran midfielder/enforcer Arturo Vidal. They were really good last year, and they have more pieces this time around.

The Nerazzurri were, along with Atalanta and RB Leipzig, easily the most proven teams in Pot 3 of the draw, and they find themselves in a chaotic group — FiveThirtyEight gives Inter, Shakhtar and Real Madrid each between a 51-59 percent chance of advancing. A win at Shakhtar next week, however, could give them not only great odds of advancing but also a solid shot at winning their group and generating a favourable draw in the round of 16.

Sleeper to reach semifinals

Sevilla

Group: E
Odds of reaching the semis, per FiveThirtyEight: 15 percent
First match: drew with Chelsea, 0-0
Next match: vs. Rennes (Oct. 28)

I know, I know: wrong tournament. Sevilla are kings of the Europa League, having won it six times since 2006, so it’s easy to simply assume they’ll finish third in their group, land in the Europa knockout round and make a run.

They have a real chance to make some noise in the UCL this time around, though. They’ve done so before, after all — they made the quarterfinals in 2018, barely falling to Bayern Munich, and they’ve now scored a road draw against their top Group E challenger in Chelsea. The Blues and Rennes both remain exciting teams, but the path to winning Group E is quite manageable.

Also… they’re pretty dang good. They brought in far more than they sent out in the transfer window, they gave Bayern fits in an eventual extra-time loss in the UEFA Super Cup, and while their goalscoring form has left them a bit in La Liga play — after scoring three goals in their league opener, they’ve scored just two since — their xG figures are solid, and their passing game is sublime. And in an offense-friendly group, they have the sturdiest defense led by centre-bacls Diego Carlos and Jules Kounde.

Sleeper to reach quarterfinals

Olympiakos

Group: C
Odds of reaching the quarters, per FiveThirtyEight: 18 percent
First match: beat Marseille, 1-0
Next match: at Porto (Oct. 27)

The top of the Greek Super League features quite a few teams capable of doing minor damage in Europe, but Pedro Martins’ Olympiacos have lost just a combined three league matches over the past two seasons.They took points from Tottenham Hotspur in last year’s Champions League, then beat Arsenal in the Europa League knockouts before falling narrowly to Wolves. In this year’s Champions League play-off round, they beat Cyprus’ Omonia to qualify, and while the scoring margin (2-0) wasn’t dramatically impressive, all the other stats were: they outshot Omonia 45-12, generated 4.2 xG to 0.7, etc. And now they’ve got three points from one match in group play.

Olympiacos are a fun mix of leathery old veterans — former Marseille attacking midfielder Mathieu Valbuena (36), former Bayern full-back Rafinha (35), former Watford full-back Jose Holebas (36) and former Granada striker Youssef El-Arabi (33) all started against Marseille — and peak-age talent like attacking midfielder Kostas Fortounis (28) and Wednesday’s goal scorer, Ahmed Hassan (27).

This is a tough, physical and unintimidated team. Even if they can’t steal points from Manchester City in Group C, they’ve got more than talent and identity to work their way into the knockout rounds.

Sleeper to reach the round of 16

Rennes

Group: E
Odds of advancing to the knockout round, per FiveThirtyEight: 21 percent
First match: drew with Krasnodar, 1-1
Next match: at Sevilla (Oct. 28)

Rennes missed a prime opportunity by only drawing with the weakest team in Group E, Krasnodar. They took the lead in the second half and then immediately gave it back. But hey, that kept their odds of advancing low enough to call them sleepers!

After finishing third in last year’s abbreviated Ligue 1 campaign and therefore qualifying for the Champions League for the first time ever, Rennes began this season with 13 points in their first five matches before losing stars Edouard Mendy (Chelsea) and Raphinha (Leeds United) to the Premier League. The next batch of stars is already in place, however, and as they gel, they could improve as the group stages move along.

Julien Stephan’s squad brought in Juventus defender Daniele Rugani and Inter Milan full-back Dalbert on loan, and new acquisition Serhou Guirassy has already scored three goals in Ligue 1 play. And they still have 17-year old phenom Eduardo Camavinga, whose presence — and uncanny ability to do this — makes them a must-watch team.

Whether or not they advance, their two group matches against Chelsea — Nov. 4 in London, Nov. 24 in Rennes — will be an absolute blessing if you enjoy things like “goals” and “fun, attacking soccer.”

Sleeper to reach the round of 16

FC Salzburg

Group: A
Odds of advancing to the knockout round, per FiveThirtyEight: 32 percent
First match: drew with Lokomotiv Moscow, 2-2
Next match: at Atletico Madrid (Oct. 27)

The No. 2 team on the Red Bull totem pole held a 1.1-0.7 xG advantage over Lokomotiv on Wednesday but suffered a disappointing draw… and their odds of advancing still went up thanks to Atletico’s massive loss to Bayern.

The spreadsheets love Salzburg: they’re 19th in FiveThirtyEight’s club rankings and 22nd at EloFootball.com. They lost Hwang Hee-chan to Leipzig — and, of course, Takumi Minamino to Liverpool and Erling Haaland to Borussia Dortmund last January — but the next generation of stars is ready for the UEFA spotlight. Patson Daka, 22, has scored 11 goals in just nine matches this year and generated more than half of Salzburg’s xG on Wednesday. Hungarian starlet Dominik Szoboszlai (19) scored the goals of the day against Lokomotiv, and Sekou Koita (20) is excellent. And now American midfielder Brenden Aaronson (19) is coming aboard as well.

It’s safe to say that your favourite club’s scouting team is and has been watching Salzburg for a while, and while getting paired with Bayern and Atletico makes advancing difficult, they have the ball-control game to make things dicey for the favourites. a win next week would put them in a strong position to advance.

The ultimate sleeper

Midtjylland

Group: D
Odds of advancing to the knockout round, per FiveThirtyEight: 3 percent
First match: lost to Atalanta, 4-0
Next match: at Liverpool (Oct. 27)

Okay, no, Midtjylland probably aren’t going to advance. FiveThirtyEight ranks them 136th overall, and their odds of advancing are better than only Basaksehir’s. They’re stuck in maybe the most aesthetically pleasing possible group with Liverpool, Atalanta and Ajax. Their goal differential is already -4. But it’s a story that they’re here. Call them a sleeper in our hearts.

Owned by former professional gambler and analytics lover Matthew Benham (who also owns Brentford FC), Midtjylland won its first Danish Superliga title in 2015 and lost to Manchester United in the 2016 Europa League knockout rounds. After years of knocking on the door, they finally qualified for the Champions League group stage by upsetting a solid Slavia Prague with a thrilling late surge of three goals in seven minutes.

Like Salzburg and Rennes, Midtjylland is developing a reputation as a top-notch scouting-and-development club — which is to say, bigger clubs are ready to pounce when a younger player looks good, and the foursome of Anders Dreyer, Sory Kaba, Awer Mabil and Frank Onyeka (four shots, 0.6 xG against Atalanta) is awfully fun to watch.

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Utah erred in athlete’s death, settles for $13.5M

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The University of Utah announced a $13.5 million settlement with the family of slain track and field athlete Lauren McCluskey on Thursday, saying for the first time that her death had been preventable.

Lauren McCluskey, a 21-year-old heptathlete at Utah, was shot and killed Oct. 22, 2018, by a man she had dated briefly, Melvin Shawn Rowland. Rowland killed himself later that night when cornered by police.

In a news conference Thursday on the school’s Salt Lake City campus, university president Ruth Watkins read a statement expressing the school’s regret after McCluskey, her mother and friends reached out for help numerous times before she was killed.

“The university acknowledges and deeply regrets that it did not handle Lauren’s case as it should have and that, at the time, its employees failed to fully understand and respond appropriately to Lauren’s situation,” Watkins said. “As a result, we failed Lauren and her family.”

McCluskey’s parents, Jill and Matt, filed a federal Title IX lawsuit in January 2019 after Watkins said publicly, following a school investigation, that nothing could have prevented Lauren’s death.

Jill McCluskey, fighting back tears as she read her statement, said the school had made progress in addressing campus safety issues over the past two years.

“We acknowledge and applaud the many positive changes that have occurred at the University of Utah since her death and we hope they continue,” she said. “This settlement is important for many reasons: It addresses how Lauren died, but also honors how she lived.”

When McCluskey — who was raised in Pullman, Washington, where her parents are professors at Washington State — first met Rowland in late summer 2018, he said he was a 28-year-old community college student named Shawn Fields.

In early October, however, she discovered his real identity, that he was actually a 37-year-old convicted sex offender on parole. She immediately broke off the relationship. Over the following two weeks, Rowland sent her text messages posing as friends saying he had been killed in an accident, stalked her at her dormitory, extorted $1,000 from her by threatening to release a compromising photo of her, came to her dorm with a pistol that he showed to other students, and sent a text to McCluskey claiming to be a police officer in what she took to be an attempt to lure her out in public.

In the two weeks before she died, McCluskey and her mother called campus police more than a dozen times seeking help. A December 2018 university investigation determined that police did not check Rowland’s parole status. Had police been aware, it’s possible Rowland could have been found in violation of his parole and returned to prison.

Also, two of McCluskey’s friends told the resident assistant in her dormitory that they believed Rowland might be a threat to McCluskey’s safety, and the resident assistant forwarded those concerns to her superiors. The resident assistant and the McCluskeys have said no subsequent action was taken.

In the statement read by Watkins on Thursday, the school said, “If these employees had more complete training and protocols to guide the responses, the university believes they would’ve been better equipped to protect Lauren.”

The statement did not specify or refer to campus police and housing officials, but employees from both departments had been named in the lawsuit.

Jill McCluskey told ESPN in January 2019 that Watkins’ previous statement that Lauren’s killing could not have been prevented sparked her and her husband to file their lawsuit.

The McCluskeys have said the goal of the lawsuit was to set off a chain reaction to improve campus safety nationwide and that a settlement could force insurance companies to push for safety reforms. The McCluskeys have said all money from the settlement will go to the Lauren McCluskey Foundation, which contributes to causes associated with “campus safety, amateur athletics and animal welfare.”

ESPN investigative producer Nicole Noren contributed to this report.

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