Taking too long? Close loading screen.
Connect with us

Business

Who is left in limbo by the stalled stimulus talks.

Published

on

President Trump’s back and forth on supporting new stimulus measures may be a high-stakes negotiating tactic, according to today’s DealBook newsletter. Until a deal is reached, here are some of the groups left in limbo:

  • Airlines and hotels. An estimated 948,000 workers in the travel and tourism industry will lose their jobs without more stimulus, according to data from Tourism Economics for the U.S. Travel Association. That’s on top of the 3.5 million jobs the industry has already lost.

  • Restaurants. A poll last month found that 40 percent of restaurant owners expected to close their establishments within six months in the absence of government aid. Three million restaurant employees have already lost their jobs.

  • State and local governments. More than four million public-sector jobs could be lost as state houses and municipalities make cuts to compensate for drops in tax revenues, according to Moody’s.

  • Unemployed people. Temporary layoffs are becoming permanent job losses, the latest data shows, with more than seven million people out of work for at least 15 weeks. A large share have relied on stimulus and extra unemployment insurance to pay mortgages and rent, according to Deloitte, risking wider financial reverberations as savings dwindle.

  • The U.S. economy as a whole. “It’s simple: Less fiscal stimulus means more economic pain,” Gregory Daco of Oxford Economics wrote in a research note. The absence of additional fiscal aid could reduce economic output 1.5 percent over the next year, he estimated.

Source

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business

Treat Sore Muscles Anywhere with This Portable Massager

Published

on

Reduce muscle pain, improve function, and more.

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

Stay informed and join our daily newsletter now!

October 25, 2020 2 min read

Disclosure: Our goal is to feature products and services that we think you’ll find interesting and useful. If you purchase them, Entrepreneur may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners.

Remote life comes with all kinds of stressors and bumps. Whether you’re uncomfortable in your office chair all day or you’ve picked up a workout regimen now that you don’t have to commute, it’s entirely likely your muscles aren’t feeling 100 percent all the time. While that’s part of aging, you can give yourself some relief with the Alyne Therapy Massager.

This patent-pending, professional-grade massager utilizes concentrated and rapid movements to treat muscle and deep-tissue pain right at the source. As it relaxes muscle tissue, it helps to drain lactic acid build-up that causes soreness, decrease nerve compression, and increase your range of motion. With three impact modes, three tilt angles, and three quick snap attachments, you can cater to all of your body’s muscle needs, whether you’re sore after a workout, stiff after sitting all day, or have chronic joint pain.

With the Alyne Therapy Massager, you can also improve blood and lymph circulation and enhance the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to muscle cells. This will give you an extra burst of energy and can even help heal scar tissue or muscle tears. With reduced pain throughout your body, you’ll be able to do more with less wear and tear.

Designed to be fully portable, the Alyne Therapy Massager can easily travel with you from home to the office to the gym to meet all of your muscle needs anywhere. So don’t just go around in pain. Normally $299, you can save 20 percent off the Alyne Therapy Massager when you get it for $239 today.

Source

Continue Reading

Business

Save More Than $200 on QuickBooks Online Essentials

Published

on

Score an awesome deal on the world’s leading accounting program.

Free Book Preview Money-Smart Solopreneur

This book gives you the essential guide for easy-to-follow tips and strategies to create more financial success.

October 25, 2020 2 min read

Disclosure: Our goal is to feature products and services that we think you’ll find interesting and useful. If you purchase them, Entrepreneur may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners.

If you earn your money by invoicing clients, you know what a hassle it can be. Not only does creating invoices take time and energy, but onboarding clients to your payment system and following up with delinquent customers to ensure they pay on time becomes a genuine waste of energy. If you’re having trouble with invoicing and managing your accounts, it may be time to bring in some technology to help.

QuickBooks Online Essentials is the web-based version of the world’s top accounting platform, specifically designed for service-based businesses. With QuickBooks Online Essentials, you can create individual or recurring invoices, track bill statuses, record payments, and much more from one intuitive app. You’ll be able to track your income and expenses seamlessly in a single portal, and QuickBooks will help you maximize tax deductions based on your accounting. You can also pay multiple vendors and bills at the same time and create checks to pay bills in person whenever you want.

QuickBooks Online Essentials goes beyond office management, as well, giving you detailed reports to analyze your expenses and manage contractors. You can even track miles, sales tax, time, and send estimates to customers before you do the work. It’s effectively everything you need to run your business.

QuickBooks Online Essentials has earned a rare Excellent review from PC Mag for good reason. See how it can help your business when you get a one-year subscription for 44 percent off with promo code “COUNT21” at checkout. 

Source

Continue Reading

Business

The Week in Business: A Headache for Big Tech

Published

on

Welcome to the weirdest (and legitimately scariest) Halloween week ever. Surprisingly, candy sales are up this year — perhaps it’s the stress eating? Here’s what you need to know in business and tech news going into Monday. — Charlotte Cowles

Credit…Giacomo Bagnara

The federal government is finally making good on its threats to crack down on big tech. The Department of Justice announced a major antitrust lawsuit against Google and accused the company of deploying unfair business tactics to squelch its competitors. (The only precedent for a case like this occurred nearly two decades ago, when the government sued Microsoft.) Google rejected the allegations and said the suit would “artificially prop up lower-quality search alternatives, raise phone prices” and hurt consumers. But many consumer advocates say it’s high time to regulate big tech more aggressively. Next up: The Federal Trade Commission is planning to vote on whether to file an antitrust lawsuit against Facebook.

Purdue Pharma, the drugmaker behind the highly addictive painkiller OxyContin, has pleaded guilty to felony charges and will be required to pay more than $8 billion in settlement fees. The company admitted to rewarding doctors for pushing prescriptions for its drugs, thereby contributing to an opioid crisis that has resulted in the deaths of more than 450,000 Americans. It still faces thousands of lawsuits in several states. As for the wealthy Sackler family, who own the company: They’re being held accountable in a separate settlement, to the tune of $225 million in penalties.

It’s been over a year since the financier Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide after being charged with sexually abusing teenage girls, but his case continues to haunt his business and personal associates. His former girlfriend, Ghislaine Maxwell, remains under arrest and has been silent on charges that she recruited victims for Mr. Epstein. But in a four-year-old deposition, released this past week, she vehemently denied any wrongdoing. Elsewhere, new revelations about financial ties between Mr. Epstein and Leon Black, the founder of the investment firm Apollo Global Management, prompted one pension fund to halt new investments with the firm and others to consider doing the same. Apollo’s board announced that it was investigating Mr. Black’s relationship to Mr. Epstein.

Credit…Giacomo Bagnara

Social media platforms are struggling to fight the spread of misinformation leading up to the election, particularly as Russia and Iran have mounted new interference campaigns to hurt the Democratic presidential candidate, Joseph R. Biden Jr. But nobody’s happy with how it’s going, particularly lawmakers. Now, the Senate has called for the chief executives of Facebook, Google and Twitter (Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai and Jack Dorsey,) to testify on Wednesday about how they’re handling hate speech, misinformation and privacy. The hearing will focus on a law that shields tech companies from liability over the content posted by their users, while also allowing them to moderate it. President Trump has claimed the rule is unfair, and wants an overhaul.

Like many art institutions, the Brooklyn Museum is struggling to absorb the pandemic’s impact on its revenue. But unlike many of its peers, it has resorted to selling notable pieces from its holdings to pay its staff and care for the rest of its collection. This week, Sotheby’s will auction off a selection of the museum’s Impressionist and modern artworks, including paintings by Henri Matisse and Claude Monet. While de-accessioning is usually prohibited by the Association of Art Museum Directors, the association has made an exception because of the pandemic, and will allow such sales to proceed through 2022.

The first report on the United States’ third-quarter gross domestic product — the broadest assessment of the economy’s health — will be released on Thursday, and is anticipated to show the fastest growth on record. But that’s because it follows a record drop in the second quarter, when many businesses were forced to close under lockdown measures. Either way, don’t get too excited by the numbers. The country’s economy is expected to slow considerably in the fourth quarter, especially as a wave of new infections hampers reopenings and, in some cases, results in more shutdowns.

Source

Continue Reading

Trending