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Trudeau says Canada will not be cowed by China on human rights

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Canadian prime minister defiant after China’s ambassador to Ottawa, Cong Peiwu, warned against the granting asylum to Hong Kong activists.

Canada will continue to defend human rights in China, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said after a top Chinese diplomat warned Ottawa against welcoming Hong Kong pro-democracy activists.

“We will stand up loudly and clearly for human rights, all around the world, whether it’s talking about the situation faced by the Uighurs, whether it’s talking about the very concerning situation in Hong Kong, whether it’s calling out China for its coercive diplomacy,” said Trudeau said on Friday.

But he added: “We don’t look to escalate.”

China’s ambassador to Ottawa, Cong Peiwu, warned Canada on Thursday against granting asylum to Hong Kong activists, which he said could have consequences for the “health and security” for the 300,000 Canadians living in the theoretically autonomous Chinese territory.

The Canadian daily The Globe and Mail said Ottawa had recently granted asylum to a Hong Kong couple, which the Canadian government has neither confirmed nor denied.

In a sign of the rising tensions between the two countries, Canadian Foreign Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne had earlier slammed the ambassador’s remarks as “totally unacceptable and disturbing.”

For his part, the new leader of the conservative opposition, Erin O’Toole, called on the Chinese diplomat “to fully retract his remarks and issue a public apology.”

“Should the ambassador fail to do so expeditiously, we expect the government to withdraw his credentials,” he said.

Relations between China and Canada have been icy since December 2018 when Canada, acting on a US warrant, arrested the chief financial officer of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, Meng Wanzhou.

Washington accused her of violating US sanctions against Iran and is pushing for her extradition.

Shortly after her arrest, China jailed a former Canadian diplomat, Michael Kovrig and a Canadian businessman, Michael Spavor, on charges of spying, an act widely seen in western capitals as an act of reprisal by Beijing.

In August this year, a Chinese court in Guangzhou also sentenced a Canadian national Xu Weihong to death for drug-related charges.

Last year, two other Canadians, Robert Lloyd Schellenberg and Fan Wei, were also sentenced to death in separate drug cases.

Canada has also stepped up political and diplomatic pressure on Beijing.

Earlier this month, a Canadian warship sailed through the sensitive Taiwan Strait, a voyage that comes at a time of separate military tension between China and Taiwan.

Canada’s navy has sailed through the Taiwan Strait before, including in September of last year.

China, which claims democratic Taiwan as its own territory, has stepped up its military activity around the island in the past few weeks, including sending fighter jets to cross the unofficial midway line, which acts as a buffer in the strait.

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In defense of Quibi

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Quibi was a bad idea, poorly executed. Now it’s dead, just six months after it debuted.

Here’s a quick timeline of its short life:

It was easy to be skeptical about Quibi before launch because … see above. The real surprise is that it failed so quickly. And even that surprise is a little bit couched. Once news got out that Katzenberg was trying to sell, the only question was whether he’d find a buyer or have to shutter. As I wrote last month, you don’t try to sell your startup five months after launch if things aren’t going terribly, even though Katzenberg insisted otherwise in sales pitches.

But, that said: I would like to see more Quibis in the future.

Not the concept or the execution (again, see above) but the model: Running a media business the old-fashioned way, where you ask people to make something, pay them for it, and then try to re-sell that work to someone else. Because there’s another version of running a media business — what YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook do — and I don’t feel great about that one in 2020.

To recap: Katzenberg and Meg Whitman, the CEO he hired away from Hewlett Packard, paid Hollywood studios, TV networks, and digital shops like Vox Media (which owns this site) to make short videos. Then they tried selling subscriptions to those videos to you.

That’s one way — the old way — to run a media business.

There are lots of variants, and you can debate the right way to scale those companies and how much money you need to make them work, etc. The model includes everything from your local newspaper (if it still exists) to TV networks to Spotify to Netflix. But they’re all using the same basic playbook.

There is also the new — and often much more successful way — to run a media business: Get people to give you stuff for free, get people to consume that stuff for free, and sell their attention to advertisers. You may not want to call yourself a media business — for strategic, valuation, or legal reasons — but you are most definitely in the media business. This has worked really, really well for YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

But as we spend a lot of time discussing these days, it’s not clear that the model that YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook use — which is dependent on ingesting as much free content as possible, and distributing as widely and quickly as possible, with as little input from the people who run those businesses as possible — is good for the rest of us.

And at the core of all the proposals to fix those businesses is the idea that they should act a lot more like … traditional media businesses. These proposals call for the people who run these platforms to pay attention to what they distribute, and even make judgment calls about whether that stuff should be distributed. And, yes: It also involves paying people who make some of the stuff they distribute.

I don’t want to belabor this thought, and I don’t want to oversell it. Quibi would have likely struggled using any model because it didn’t have stuff people wanted to see, and it didn’t have the distribution it needed to get it in front of them, anyway.

And while the Facebooks of the world run on free content, they certainly have to spend money on lots of other stuff. TikTok, for example, spent $1 billion on marketing in a single year in order to get its free videos, uploaded for free by its users, in front of people around the world.

But if you’re going to dunk on Quibi for failing so big, so fast, at least give them this: They failed the old-fashioned way. Which still has an upside.


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FDA says there is no timeline for a Covid-19 vaccine

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A health worker works in a lab during clinical trials for a Covid-19 vaccine at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Florida, on September 9.
A health worker works in a lab during clinical trials for a Covid-19 vaccine at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Florida, on September 9. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg/Getty Images

US Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn said Wednesday that the agency does not have a set timeline to review a Covid-19 vaccine.

The goal, he said, is that everyone could get a vaccine by spring. But it “really depends on a number of factors.”

“We want to expedite it,” Hahn said at a conference sponsored by the Milken Institute, a nonpartisan think tank founded by ex-banker Michael Milken.

“We’ve said that we will schedule a vaccine advisory committee to review those data. We have committed for every application to have a vaccine advisory committee,” Hahn said.

“We will make that public, as I mentioned. Our scientists will make an initial determination, will ask specific questions about the product from the vaccine advisory committee. And then we will incorporate that in our decision making,” Hahn said.

“At the end of the day, only our career scientists in the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research will be making this decision, and they will be making it solely upon the science and data that come from the clinical trials.”

To speed up the process, Hahn said the FDA has been working with manufacturers from day one and have stayed in touch throughout the manufacturing process, rather than reviewing everything at the end of the process. 

“We need to make sure that there’s quality and consistency and that every lot has the same ability to provide protection to all of Americans,” Hahn said. “We have a lot of confidence in the manufacturing of these developers, and we will be doing our part with respect to working with them to make sure that manufacturing can be ramped up as quickly as possible.”

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Trump slams US stimulus deal on Twitter as talks continue

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Trump’s evening tweets came hours after all three major stock indexes fell over the ongoing stimulus deadlock.

United States President Donald Trump expressed scepticism that an agreement could be reached with Democratic leaders on a new round of coronavirus aid relief, seemingly torpedoing hopes for a stimulus plan even as talks continue between Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Secretary Treasury Steve Mnuchin.

“Just don’t see any way Nancy Pelosi and Cryin’ Chuck Schumer will be willing to do what is right for our great American workers, or our wonderful USA itself, on Stimulus,” Trump wrote on Twitter Wednesday evening. “Their primary focus is BAILING OUT poorly run (and high crime) Democrat cities and states….Should take care of our people. It wasn’t their fault that the Plague came in from China!”

The tweets came after all three financial indexes fell on Wednesday amid dwindling hopes of a stimulus plan before Americans head to the polls on Election Day November 3.

Pelosi has proposed $2.2 trillion to help struggling businesses and families, while the White House rolled out a $1.8 trillion proposal, which Trump has since said he would be willing to go beyond. But Pelosi and Mnuchin are reportedly getting closer to a deal, with the pair due to speak again on Thursday, Pelosi’s spokesman said in a tweet.

Experts have warned the US needs another round of financial relief for struggling businesses and families in order to recover from the pandemic’s economic downturn. The last round of aid expired at the end of July, including an additional $600 per week in federal unemployment benefits meant to shore up workers in addition to state aid.

Earlier this month, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell warned that the country’s entire economic recovery is in danger of derailing if the government does not step up to the plate.

“Too little support would lead to a weak recovery, creating unnecessary hardship for households and businesses,” Powell said during an October 7 event with economists and strategists.

Trump has frequently used Twitter to weigh in on the continuing stimulus talks. On the same day Powell spoke, Trump tweeted that he had told his representatives to halt stimulus negotiations with Democrats until after the election – before making an about-face hours later and urging Democratic legislators to cast targeted financial lines to businesses and households.

Last week, he tweeted: “STIMULUS! “Go big or go home!!!” even as Senate Republicans expressed support for a pared-down aid package.

On Wednesday, Trump’s chief of staff, Mark Meadows, told Fox Business “the president’s willing to lean into this” with Republican senators if a deal is reached.

Talks are continuing as the timeframe for a pre-Election Day vote narrows, with investors around the world closely watching what comes out of Pelosi and Mnuchin’s discussions Thursday.

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