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Stetson Bennett IV gives Georgia best chance to take down Alabama

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BLACKSHEAR, Ga. — When Stetson Bennett III moved his family from suburban Atlanta to southeast Georgia in the summer of 2004, he took his eldest son and namesake to see the small town’s high school football stadium while they waited for moving trucks to arrive.

“Daddy, it’s a little small,” Stetson Bennett IV said.

“Yeah, but they’ll have to make it bigger when you get here,” his father told him.

Stetson Bennett IV was in the first grade.

While the stage might have seemed small in Brantley County back then, Bennett IV couldn’t ask for a bigger one on Saturday night. He has unexpectedly become Georgia’s starting quarterback and will lead the No. 3 Bulldogs in a nationally televised game at No. 2 Alabama.

“No, I don’t think it could get any bigger until Dec. 19,” Bennett IV said, referring to the scheduled date for the SEC championship game in Atlanta. “It’s going to be pretty big Saturday.”

Bennett IV’s circuitous route from lightly recruited high school prospect to preferred walk-on to junior college and then back to Georgia occurred because most college coaches believed he was too small to succeed at the FBS level.

Despite leading Pierce County High School to three consecutive state playoff appearances and throwing for 3,724 yards, running for 500 and scoring 40 total touchdowns as a senior, his only FBS scholarship offer came from Middle Tennessee State. FCS programs such as Mercer, Samford, Harvard and Princeton wanted him, but FBS coaches thought he was too short and too light.

“When you grow up in a little small town in Georgia, it’s hard to be seen,” his father said. “Even when you are, it’s easy to be discounted.”

Bennett III did everything in his control to make sure his son had a chance at following his dream to play big-time college football. While his new pharmacy was being built in Nahunta, Georgia, which is about 80 miles northwest of Jacksonville, Florida, he leveled an adjoining lot for a football field.

The field was only 80 yards long; one of the end zones would have been in the middle of Highway 82 if it were the full 100 yards. Orange construction fences prevented footballs (and players) from bounding into traffic.

Bennett III purchased two 53-foot shipping containers, cut off one side of each, and had them welded together. The “Hideout” sat behind his pharmacy, and it’s where Bennett IV and his Brantley Bandits teammates gathered nearly every day.

“I walked the halls of the elementary school recruiting kids to play,” his father said. “It didn’t matter if he was 30 pounds or 80, I told him he looked like he was going to be a football player.”

After school, the players gathered at the Hideout for snacks of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and milk, a 15-minute devotional, tutoring and homework, and then a workout and practice. There were shelves for the players to hang their equipment, along with two referee shirts and a pair of whistles.

Bennett III and other coaches lined the field with 10-yard lines and hash marks. One thing missing: a chain gang. If a kickoff was returned to the 32-yard line, the possession started at the 30-yard line. If the next pass went 14 yards, it was backed up to the 40. The local rules often left opponents scratching their heads.

During game week, Bennett III hung a banner promoting the game from his pharmacy, and it wasn’t unusual for 100 people or so to show up.

During Bennett IV’s seventh-grade season in 2010, the Brantley Bandits played a 34-game schedule, including three games in one day. They finished 32-2.

“Gosh, that would be crazy to do now,” Bennett IV said. “We traveled all over the place.”

As an eighth-grader, Bennett IV sat in the Pierce County High School team’s quarterback meetings and broke down film with head coach Sean Pender. That same season, after he threw for 455 yards against a rival school’s JV team, the varsity coach told his dad, “That boy is for real. I’ve never seen a performance like that. He can throw it in a mailbox.”

The legend of the “Mailman” was born. A year or two later, a Pierce County High teammate, whose father was mayor of a nearby town, gave Bennett IV a U.S. Postal Service hat.

“We started calling him the Mailman,” said Kole Kicklighter, one of his teammates in high school. “He liked it and everybody else liked it, so it stuck.”

Bennett IV wore the blue Postal Service hat in an attempt to stand out at 7-on-7 tournaments and college camps.

Still, the Power 5 scholarship offer that he desperately wanted never came.

“Sometimes I just didn’t really understand it because I was like, ‘Well, I’m pretty sure I’m better than these guys, and I think I’m smarter than them and faster than them,'” Bennett IV said. “I really didn’t know what was going on. I guess you just get used to it and then just say, ‘Well, you’ve just got to show them sometimes.'”

Pender, who played for Hal Mumme at Valdosta State, said height was the only reason his quarterback wasn’t more heavily recruited.

“He was always smaller, maybe 5 feet, 9 inches as a sophomore,” Pender said. “He had a live arm and was fast, witty and had a gunslinger’s mentality. He wouldn’t dwell on mistakes and moved on. He just has that knack. You can tell some kids have that ‘it’ factor. He has it.”

His father and mother, Denise, both attended Georgia, and he grew up attending Bulldogs games. UGA’s coaches didn’t seem interested, either.

That changed when Georgia signee Richard LeCounte told Bulldogs coach Kirby Smart about the fleet-footed quarterback. LeCounte had played against Bennett IV and Stanford commitment Davis Mills (Greater Atlanta Christian), who was rated the country’s top quarterback by at least two recruiting services in 2016.

“Davis Mills might be the best quarterback in the country,” LeCounte told Smart, according to Stetson Bennett III, “but he’s only second best in Class AAA. I’ve played against both, and Stetson Bennett is better.”

Bennett joined the Bulldogs as a preferred walk-on and ran the scout-team offense while redshirting in 2017. He drew praise from Georgia’s defense after mimicking Heisman Trophy winner Baker Mayfield in preparation for playing Oklahoma in a CFP semifinal at the Rose Bowl.

“Stetson Bennett is a beast, man,” then-defensive coordinator Mel Tucker said at the time. “He puts a lot of pressure on our defense because he is extremely quick, he’s fast and he can throw. He can throw in the pocket and he can throw on the run and he’s very, very competitive.”

Then-Bulldogs linebacker Lorenzo Carter, now with the New York Giants, said Bennett IV made him and current Chicago Bears linebacker Roquan Smith “look silly” in Rose Bowl practices.

“He’s a quick guy,” Carter said. “He can outrun a lot of people. He’s made Roquan look silly; he’s made me look silly. He’s made a lot of people look silly.”

Yet, when Georgia signed highly regarded freshman Justin Fields to compete with returning starter Jake Fromm the next season, Bennett IV could see the writing on the wall. He transferred to Jones College in Ellisville, Mississippi, where he threw for 1,840 yards with 16 touchdowns in 2018.

Bennett IV was set to sign with Louisiana when Pender called him, shortly after Fields announced he was transferring to Ohio State.

“Would you go back to Georgia if they’ll have you?” Pender asked him.

“Yes,” Bennett IV said. “But it has to be different this time.”

Pender had become friendly with then-Bulldogs offensive line coach Sam Pittman, who was recruiting Warren McClendon from Brunswick High School on the Georgia coast, where Pender is now coaching. Pender helped reunite Bennett IV with the Bulldogs.

“I think that’s what it was — just to have a chance this time to compete for the starting job,” Bennett IV said.

Last season, Bennett IV played in five games behind Fromm, attempting 27 passes with two touchdowns. When Fromm left early for the NFL draft, the Bulldogs brought in two transfers — Wake Forest’s Jamie Newman and USC’s JT Daniels — to compete to replace him.

Bennett IV seemed like the odd man out once again. In fact, a couple of weeks before the start of preseason camp in August, new offensive coordinator Todd Monken told him as much.

“It was frustrating, but I just kept my head down and kept working and trying to prove them wrong,” Bennett IV said. “I wanted to make sure whenever my number was called, I would be ready to go.”

On Sept. 2, Newman announced that he was opting out of the season because of concerns about the coronavirus. Daniels, who had missed all but one game at USC last season because of a knee injury, still hadn’t been medically cleared to play. Bennett IV and redshirt freshman D’Wan Mathis were left to compete for the starting job.

The Bulldogs went with Mathis in the Sept. 26 opener at Arkansas, but he looked overwhelmed while completing 8 of 17 passes for 55 yards with one interception. Bennett IV came off the bench and threw for 211 yards and two touchdowns on 20-for-29 passing, leading Georgia to a 37-10 win.

“Stetson is confident. He’s confident in himself, and he’s a competitor,” offensive lineman Jamaree Salyer said. “Stets goes out there and gives it everything he’s got every day. He doesn’t like to lose. You can just see that on the job when he came in at Arkansas.”

Bennett IV threw for 240 yards with one score in a 27-6 victory over then-No. 7 Auburn the next week, and then had 238 passing yards with three total touchdowns in a 44-21 win over then-No. 14 Tennessee last week.

In three games, he is completing 63.1% of his attempts with five touchdowns and no interceptions. His Total QBR of 93.1 ranks third among FBS players, behind Ole Miss’ Matt Corral and Alabama’s Mac Jones.

“I honestly think he’s just himself,” Smart said. “He doesn’t try to be someone else. He doesn’t try to artificially lead or fake it. He never did that while he was trying to compete for the job and he hasn’t done it since he got the job. Stetson is who he is, and I think the skill players on offense, the offensive line, they all trust him and rally around him because they know he understands what we’re trying to do offensively and he can put them in good situations.”

On Saturday night, in a game that might very well impact the SEC championship and CFP races, Bennett IV will face his most difficult test on the biggest stage yet.

It will be a long way from that tiny football stadium in southeast Georgia.

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Will Dodgers be OK if Dustin May, Tony Gonsolin don’t contribute more?

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ARLINGTON, Texas — The Los Angeles Dodgers were three days removed from a taxing seventh game of the National League Championship Series and needed Tony Gonsolin to give them as much as he could as their opener in Game 2 of the World Series on Wednesday night. He provided four outs, but allowed a home run to the second batter he faced.

With the deficit at only a run and two outs in the top of the fourth, the Dodgers needed Dustin May to keep the game close and bridge the gap to their high-leverage relievers. He was charged with three earned runs and exited before the start of the sixth.

The Dodgers cycled through seven pitchers in their 6-4 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays, evening the Fall Classic at one game apiece.

Given the state of their pitching heading in, a loss like this might have been expected. But it also reinforced a problem that could haunt the Dodgers in what remains of this final round — May and Gonsolin, the two young starters counted on to be multi-dimensional weapons in October, haven’t been effective enough. And whether it’s execution or inexperience or a product of their unconventional usage is anyone’s guess.

“I still trust them, I still believe in them, and they just have to make pitches,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “We’ll look at the video and see what we can do better at, but they’re still gonna need to get big outs for us.”

May, 23, and Gonsolin, 26, combined to produce a 2.46 ERA in a combined 102⅔ innings during the regular season, placing themselves squarely in the thick of a deep field for the National League Rookie of the Year Award. Since then, they have been charged with 13 earned runs on 15 hits and 13 walks in 16⅔ innings in the postseason and haven’t come anywhere close to a traditional five-day schedule.

When Gonsolin took the ball for Game 2 of the NL Championship Series — in place of Clayton Kershaw, who was scratched that morning because of back spasms — it marked his first appearance in 17 days. He was charged with five runs in 4⅓ innings. Five days later, he came into the top of the second in Game 7, gave up a leadoff homer to Dansby Swanson, then allowed the first three batters to reach in the fourth and was taken out. Three days after that, he opened Game 2 of the World Series.

May was effective as a multi-inning reliever early in the postseason, compiling three scoreless innings in the NL Division Series against the Padres and getting five outs late in Game 1 of the NLCS. But he gave up a run in each of his two innings as an opener in Game 5 and allowed the first three batters to reach as an opener in Game 7. Three days later, he was coming out of the bullpen again.

“It’s a big ask, to be quite frank,” Roberts said. “Right now, with the off-days, every team is gonna go down a starter, so that’s one thing. And so people have to adjust to certain roles. And when you’re talking about playing seven days in a row and how you can get as many outs as you can in the CS — yeah, these guys are in uncharted territory. Credit to them — they’re not making any excuses. They expect themselves to make pitches.”

The Dodgers traded Kenta Maeda, let Hyun-Jin Ryu and Rich Hill depart via free agency, and lost David Price after he decided to opt out of the 2020 season. And yet they still sported the second-best rotation ERA in the majors during the regular season. May, with his triple-digit sinkers, and Gonsolin, with his nasty sliders, were a major reason for that. They came on so strong that the Dodgers felt comfortable plucking from their starting-pitching depth before the non-waiver trade deadline, sending clubhouse favorite Ross Stripling to the Toronto Blue Jays so that he could finally solidify a spot in a major league rotation.

But May and Gonsolin haven’t come close to resembling the postseason weapons the Dodgers were hoping they would be.

On Tuesday, Brandon Lowe, who entered with a .107/.180/.161 slash line this postseason, homered off each of them. With Julio Urias saved for Game 4, Clayton Kershaw scheduled for Game 5 and Walker Buehler lined up to take the ball in Games 3 and 7, May and Gonsolin will likely continue on in uncertainty.

They’ll need to adapt quickly.

“It’s different, certainly,” Roberts said. “But I still, we still, need those guys to get important outs going forward for us to win this thing.”

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Lowe busts out with 2 HRs as Rays even Series

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ARLINGTON, Texas — Through all the struggles, all the moments when it looked like he should be dropped down in the lineup or out of it altogether, Brandon Lowe believed.

He had built himself into one of the American League’s best hitters, and no slump, not even one during the playoffs, could derail that. The Tampa Bay Rays kept believing in Lowe, too. And in Game 2 of the World Series, both were rewarded handsomely for their faith.

Lowe became the first player to hit two opposite-field home runs in one World Series game, and the Rays’ bullpen bent but didn’t break as they held on for a 6-4 victory Wednesday night to even the series at one game apiece.

The 26-year-old Lowe, an All-Star two years ago as a rookie and a down-ballot MVP candidate this year, had endured a brutal postseason: 6-for-56 with 19 strikeouts and not one multihit game among the 15 the Rays had played. And yet Tampa Bay never wavered — he sat only one game and pinch hit in it — confident that Lowe would find his swing.

“For better or worse,” Rays manager Kevin Cash said before Game 2, “we’re going to stick with guys we have a lot of faith in.”

He had, after all, figured out how to leverage his 5-foot-10, 185-pound frame into one of the great power swings in the AL. With extra time spent analyzing video and recognizing flaws in his swing, he corrected it and saw the dividends early in Game 2.

Lowe, hitting in the No. 2 hole, punished a 95 mph fastball from rookie starter Tony Gonsolin out to left field, giving the Rays an early advantage. He piled on with a two-run shot off rookie Dustin May in the fifth inning, pushing the Rays’ advantage to 5-0.

In the meantime, Rays starter Blake Snell hadn’t allowed a hit, striking out two Dodgers in each of the first four innings. Following the fourth, Snell bounded off the mound, shouting into the expanse of Globe Life Field, to no one and everyone among the crowd of 11,472. He looked like his Cy Young-winning self, his fastball, curveball and slider confounding a group of Dodgers hitters who in Game 1 piled up eight runs through power, patience and proficiency wielding the bat.

The fifth ended Snell’s dreams of a no-hitter — and his night altogether. With two out, he walked Kiké Hernandez and served up a home run to Chris Taylor. After a walk to Mookie Betts and a single by Corey Seager, Snell’s night was over.

Nick Anderson wiped out the inherited runners by striking out Justin Turner, and though he allowed a solo home run to Will Smith and reliever Pete Fairbanks served one up to Seager, the cushion provided by Lowe stood as left-hander Aaron Loup recorded two outs and right-hander Diego Castillo the final out for the save. The win went to Anderson.

Lowe’s multihomer game was the 55th in World Series history, the seventh by a second baseman and the first by a Rays player. And it continued Tampa Bay’s trend of needing home runs to score. The Rays set a record with 28 home runs this postseason, and entering the World Series, nearly 72% of their runs had come via the longball.

The return of the Lowe who helped guide the Rays to the AL East title was a welcome sign for a Tampa Bay team whose offensive struggles were of paramount concern — particularly with the prospect of falling down 0-2 to the Dodgers. Lowe had hit .269/.362/.554 with 14 home runs in 56 games during the regular season and ranked just behind Juan Soto and Ronald Acuña Jr. in wins above replacement.

Now, after a Thursday off-day, the teams return Friday for Game 3 with the best pitching matchup of the series: Dodgers ace Walker Buehler against Rays stalwart Charlie Morton.

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Lowe busts out with 2 HRs as Rays even up WS

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ARLINGTON, Texas — Through all the struggles, all the moments when it looked like he should be dropped down in the lineup or out of it altogether, Brandon Lowe believed.

He had built himself into one of the American League’s best hitters, and no slump, not even one during the playoffs, could derail that. The Tampa Bay Rays kept believing in Lowe, too. And in Game 2 of the World Series, both were rewarded handsomely for their faith.

Lowe became the first player ever to hit two opposite-field home runs in one World Series game, and the Rays’ bullpen bent but didn’t break as they held on for a 6-4 victory Wednesday night to even the series at one game apiece.

The 26-year-old Lowe, an All-Star two years ago as a rookie and a down-ballot MVP candidate this year, had endured a brutal postseason: 6-for-56 with 19 strikeouts and not one multi-hit game among the 15 the Rays had played. And yet Tampa Bay never wavered — he sat only one game and pinch hit in it — confident that Lowe would find his swing.

“For better or worse,” Rays manager Kevin Cash said before Game 2, “we’re going to stick with guys we have a lot of faith in.”

He had, after all, figured out how to leverage his 5-foot-10, 185-pound frame into one of the great power swings in the AL. With extra time spent analyzing video and recognizing flaws in his swing, he corrected it and saw the dividends early in Game 2.

Lowe, hitting in the No. 2 hole, punished a 95 mph fastball from rookie starter Tony Gonsolin out to left field, giving the Rays an early advantage. He piled on with a two-run shot off rookie Dustin May in the fifth inning, pushing the Rays’ advantage to 5-0.

In the meantime, Rays starter Blake Snell hadn’t allowed a hit, striking out two Dodgers in each of the first four innings. Following the fourth, Snell bounded off the mound, shouting into the expanse of Globe Life Field, to no one and everyone among the crowd of 11,472. He looked like his Cy Young-winning self, his fastball, curve ball and slider confounding a group of Dodgers hitters who in Game 1 piled up eight runs through power, patience and proficiency wielding the bat.

The fifth ended Snell’s dreams of a no-hitter — and his night altogether. With two outs, he walked Kiké Hernandez and served up a home run to Chris Taylor. After a walk to Mookie Betts and a single by Corey Seager, Snell’s night was over.

Nick Anderson wiped out the inherited runners by striking out Justin Turner, and though he allowed a solo home run to Will Smith and reliever Pete Fairbanks served one up to Seager, the cushion provided by Lowe stood as left-hander Aaron Loup recorded two outs and right-hander Diego Castillo the final out for the save. The win went to Anderson.

Lowe’s multi-homer game was the 55th in World Series history, the seventh by a second baseman and the first by a Rays player. And it continued Tampa Bay’s trend of needing home runs to score. They set a record with 28 home runs this postseason, and entering the World Series, nearly 72% of their runs had come via the longball.

The return of the Lowe who helped guide the Rays to the AL East title was a welcome sign for a Tampa Bay team whose offensive struggles were of paramount concern — particularly with the prospect of falling down 0-2 to the Dodgers. Lowe had hit .269/.362/.554 with 14 home runs in 56 games during the regular season and ranked just behind Juan Soto and Ronald Acuña Jr. in wins above replacement.

Now, after a Thursday off-day, the teams return for Game 3 with the best pitching matchup of the series: Dodgers ace Walker Buehler against Rays stalwart Charlie Morton.

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