Taking too long? Close loading screen.
Connect with us

World

Poor Indian women ‘learn to ignore’ sex abuse at work: Watchdog

Published

on

From lewd comments to demands for sex, women working in India’s vast informal sector rarely report sexual harassment for fear of losing their jobs, labour rights campaigners said on Wednesday, three years after the #MeToo movement began.

From street vendors and factory workers to maids, 95 percent of Indian women work in the informal sector and many are exploited regularly, despite a law ordering employers to set up committees to resolve harassment complaints, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said in a report.

The Ministry of Women and Child Development did not respond to repeated requests for comment. It launched an online complaint box for sexual harassment at work in 2017, which received about 600 complaints in its first two years.

Shalini, a maid who was sexually harassed by a security guard for months while working at a private residence on the outskirts of the capital New Delhi, said women in her position were too scared to speak out.

“Some families blame the woman and start beating her. If you tell your employer, then they will fire you … Police are the worst. They ask really inappropriate questions,” said Shalini, whose name has been changed to protect her identity.

“With no one to turn to, most women just bottle it all up inside. They learn to ignore or normalise it,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation, adding that in her case, the guard was transferred after her family complained to his employer.

Little effect of #MeToo in rural areas

The #MeToo campaign led to complaints of sexual misconduct by prominent journalists, film stars and executives across India but had little effect in remote, rural areas where sex crimes are rife, according to women’s rights activists.

“The #MeToo movement helped to shine a light on violence and harassment at work, but the experiences of millions of women in India’s informal sector remain invisible,” said Meenakshi Ganguly, HRW South Asia director.

“India has progressive laws to protect women from sexual abuse by bosses, colleagues, and clients, but has failed to take basic steps to enforce these laws.”

Reporting of sex crimes increased in India after the fatal gang rape of a student on a bus in 2012, with the introduction of tougher penalties, including a 2013 law to combat sexual harassment at work.

Although the groundbreaking law mandates employers with at least 10 workers to set up women-led complaint committees with the power to fine or fire those found guilty of harassment, it remains largely an idea on paper, local researchers found.

Only about 30 percent of 655 districts surveyed said they had formed committees, found a 2018 study by the Martha Farrell Foundation, a women’s rights group, and Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA India), a research centre which advocates for gender equality.

“The implementation of the law has failed in the informal sector,” said Anagha Sarpotdar, chairwoman of a complaints committee in Mumbai, India’s most populous city, adding that lack of awareness about the system led to few reports.

Shalini Sinha, country representative for WIEGO, a network which helps informal workers, said it was important to form and bolster associations, self-help groups and trade unions to empower women.

“These can strengthen women so that this sense of isolation that they feel while trying to report sexual harassment is not there,” she said, adding they can also raise women’s awareness on their rights.

But Shalini, the maid, said she still would not report sexual harassment, even though she knew her rights, as “people like me do not get justice”.

Instead, she jots down her employers’ phone numbers, addresses and her work hours in each home so that her family knows where she is at all times.

“Some employers are good, some are bad. But because of previous experiences, there is always a fear inside me,” she said.

Source

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

World

Third-degree murder charge dropped against former officer in George Floyd killing

Published

on

A Minneapolis judge has dropped the third-degree murder charge against former police officer Derek Chauvin in the May killing of 46-year-old George Floyd that was captured on video and set off protests worldwide.

Chauvin’s attorneys filed a motion to have all charges against Chauvin dropped, but the judge sustained the higher charge of second-degree murder as well as the lower charge of second-degree manslaughter. Video of the killing shows Chauvin pinning Floyd to the ground by his neck with a knee for nearly nine minutes.

In the ruling, Judge Peter Cahill said the third-degree murder charge is only met when the defendant’s actions were “eminently dangerous to other persons” and not directed at the person who was killed.

The judge also sustained all charges for the three other former officers involved in the killing of Floyd: J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane, and Tou Thao. All three petitioned to have their charges dropped for lack of probable cause, but each still faces one count of aiding and abetting second-degree murder and one of aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

While Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz called the judge’s decision “a positive step in the path toward justice for George Floyd,” he also called in the National Guard in anticipation of protests over Chauvin’s dropped charge.

While Walz says his decision to call in the National Guard is a precautionary measure, the governor risks inciting violence. One report found that at the protests where violence occurred — fewer than 10 percent — it was usually the result of increased law enforcement presence. Other reports show that protesters had to deescalate the police.

Walz had previously called in 100 National Guard, 100 state troopers, and 75 conservation officers after Chauvin posted $1 million bail on October 7, according to CNN. Protesters rallied upon his release.

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, who will prosecute Chauvin and the other officers in court before a jury in Hennepin County, called the judge’s dismissal a “positive step forward.”

“The court’s decision to dismiss just one of the lesser charges against just one of the defendants — while leaving intact all the charges against the other three defendants — is based on how appellate courts have interpreted the statute in question,” he said in a statement. We are considering our options in light of the court’s strong order on the remaining charges.”

Floyd’s death ignited widespread Black Lives Matter protests in late May. Five months later, thousands around the country continue to march against police brutality and systemic racism, the ills that protesters say led to the killing of Floyd and countless other Black people. As Chauvin kneeled on Floyd’s neck, outside of the store where Floyd apparently tried to use a $20 counterfeit bill, Floyd called out for his mother and said, “I can’t breathe” — a phrase that had previously galvanized social justice demonstrations.


Help keep Vox free for all

Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.

Source

Continue Reading

World

Twitter and Facebook bosses ordered to testify by GOP senators

Published

on

The GOP push against Facebook and Twitter accelerated on Thursday after Republican senators threatened the CEOs of the social media companies with subpoenas to force them to address accusations of censorship in the closing weeks of the presidential campaign.

With Democrats boycotting the hearing, the Republican-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee voted to authorise the legal orders if Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey did not agree to testify voluntarily.

The committee wants to hear from them about “the suppression and/or censorship of two news articles from the New York Post,” according to the subpoena document. Senators also want information from the executives about their companies’ policies for moderating content “that may interfere” with federal elections.

A Facebook spokesperson declined to comment. Twitter representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Facebook and Twitter acted last week to limit the online dissemination and sharing of an unverified political story from the conservative-leaning New York Post that targeted Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. The story, which other publications have not confirmed, cited unverified emails from Biden’s son Hunter that were reportedly disclosed by President Donald Trump’s allies.

One email purported to show a top adviser for Burisma, the Ukraine gas company where Hunter Biden held a board seat, thanking Biden for giving him an opportunity to meet the elder Biden, who was vice president at the time.

Trump’s campaign seized on the report, though the account raised more questions than answers, including whether emails at the centre of the story were hacked or fabricated.

It was the first time in recent memory that the two social media platforms enforced rules against misinformation on a story from a mainstream media publication.

With the November 3 election looming, Facebook and Twitter have scrambled to stem the tide of material seen as potentially inciting violence and spreading disinformation and baseless conspiracy theories. Facebook has expanded its restrictions on political advertising, including new bans on messages claiming widespread voter fraud.

Trump has raised the prospect of mass fraud in the vote-by-mail process.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Gastonia, North Carolina, on October 21, 2020 [REUTERS/Tom Brenner]

The companies also have wrestled with how strongly they should intervene in speech on their platforms.

With Trump leading the way, conservatives have stepped up their claims that Facebook, Twitter and Google, which owns YouTube, are biased, charging without evidence that Silicon Valley’s social media platforms are deliberately suppressing conservative views.

The Justice Department has asked Congress to roll back long-held legal protections for online platforms. The proposed changes would strip some of the bedrock protections that have generally shielded the companies from legal responsibility for what people post on their platforms.

Trump signed an executive order this year challenging the protections from lawsuits under a 1996 telecommunications law that has served as the foundation for unfettered speech on the internet.

The Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, on a bipartisan vote, recently authorised subpoenas for Zuckerberg, Dorsey and Google CEO Sundar Pichai. The three have agreed to testify for a hearing planned for next week.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks on stage during a Google event in Delhi, India in 2017 [Cathal McNaughton/Reuters]

Democrats have focused their criticism of social media mainly on hate speech, misinformation and other content that they say can incite violence or keep people from voting. They have criticised the CEOs for failing to police content, focusing on the platforms’ role in hate crimes and the rise of white nationalism in the US.

In 2017, following deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, tech giants began banning hardline groups and individuals espousing white supremacist views and support for violence. Facebook extended the ban to white nationalists.

From both political parties, the companies have come under increasing scrutiny in Washington and from state attorney-generals over issues of competition, consumer privacy and hate speech.

On Tuesday, the Justice Department filed a landmark antitrust case against Google, accusing it of abusing its dominance in online search and advertising to boost profits. It was the government’s most significant attempt to protect competition since a groundbreaking case against Microsoft more than 20 years ago.

Facebook, Amazon and Apple also have been targets of antitrust investigations by the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission.

Source

Continue Reading

World

The best under-$20 skin care on Amazon, according to derms

Published

on

(CNN) —  

Unlike fashion, the beauty industry relies on a mix of marketing, trends and actual science to keep you looking your best. And while it can feel really luxurious to drop a lot of money on a fancy skin care product in the name of self-care, sometimes the best product for the job isn’t the one with the highest price tag.

“It’s not necessary to spend a lot of money on skin care products,” confirms Dr. Elyse M. Love, who notes that most dermatologists use drugstore products in their own skin care routines. Still, the reasons behind triple-digit costs vary widely: “Sometimes it’s because an ingredient is difficult to formulate, sometimes it’s because the product has undergone thorough clinical testing, sometimes it’s because the product delivers an active ingredient with less irritation — and sometimes it’s purely marketing.”

We’re all for treating yourself, but it helps to know when you might need to drop some serious cash on a product and when the more affordable option will work just as well. “Certain ingredients like botanical extracts and antioxidants like vitamin C tend to cost more, which is why many products containing these ingredients are more expensive,” says Dr. Joshua Zeichner, director of cosmetic and clinical research at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Department of Dermatology. He regularly recommends brands like Aquaphor and Cetaphil, which he says are staple brands for many dermatologists. “There are many products available right at your local drugstore, which may work as well if not better than competitors’, that cost double the amount,” he says.

Ahead, check out the affordable, under-$20 skin care products that dermatologists recommend by name.

Neutrogena Pore Refining Toner With Witch Hazel ($6.54, originally $10.51; amazon.com)

Neutrogena Pore Refining Toner With Witch Hazel
Neutrogena Pore Refining Toner With Witch Hazel
PHOTO: Amazon

This toner combines glycolic and salicylic acids to help remove dirt, oil and dead cells from the surface of the skin to brighten the complexion and minimize the appearance of pores,” says Zeichner.

Neutrogena Hydro Boost Gentle Cleansing Gel ($7.64; amazon.com)

Neutrogena Hydro Boost Gentle Cleansing Gel
Neutrogena Hydro Boost Gentle Cleansing Gel
PHOTO: Amazon

“My favorite cleanser for winter is the Neutrogena Hydroboost Cleansing Gel,” says Love. “It provides adequate cleansing without stripping the skin.”

Aveeno Oat Face Mask With Soothing Pumpkin Seed Extract ($7.48; amazon.com)

Aveeno Oat Face Mask With Soothing Pumpkin Seed Extract
Aveeno Oat Face Mask With Soothing Pumpkin Seed Extract
PHOTO: Amazon

Aveeno’s Oat and Pumpkin Mask is a great option to hydrate and protect inflamed skin,” says Zeichner. “Colloidal oatmeal has anti-inflammatory properties, while pumpkin seed oil is rich in emollient oils to soothe the skin.”

L’Oréal Paris Derm Intensives Vitamin C Serum ($21.20, originally $23.99; mazon.com)

L
L’Oréal Paris Derm Intensives Vitamin C Serum
PHOTO: Amazon

“This is a great drugstore brand antioxidant,” says Zeichner. “It contains 10% vitamin C in a stabilized anhydrous delivery system to help brighten and even skin tone.”

Dove Body Wash With Pump ($8.18, originally $12.09; amazon.com)

Dove Body Wash With Pump
Dove Body Wash With Pump
PHOTO: Amazon

According to both Love and Zeichner, this body wash is a go-to drugstore favorite. “Its hypoallergenic formula uses ultra-gentle cleansers along with the same type of hydrating ingredients found in traditional moisturizers,” says Zeichner.

Differin Gel Acne Spot Treatment for Face With Adapalene ($12.88, originally $14.99; amazon.com)

Differin Gel Acne Spot Treatment for Face With Adapalene
Differin Gel Acne Spot Treatment for Face With Adapalene
PHOTO: Amazon

Differin’s vitamin A acne treatment is prescription strength — and one of Love’s favorite under-$20 skin care products.

Eucerin Advanced Repair Lotion ($8.97, originally $11.99; amazon.com)

Eucerin Advanced Repair Lotion
Eucerin Advanced Repair Lotion
PHOTO: Amazon

Love also recommends this no-frills body lotion, which has more than 4,000 5-star reviews.

Vaseline Intensive Care Advanced Repair Lotion ($7.43, originally $9.99; amazon.com)

Vaseline Intensive Care Advanced Repair Lotion
Vaseline Intensive Care Advanced Repair Lotion
PHOTO: Amazon

“This contains triple-purified petrolatum in a nongreasy, easy-to-spread lotion to help hydrate and protect dry skin,” says Zeichner.

CeraVe Therapeutic Hand Cream for Dry Cracked Hands ($10.99; amazon.com)

CeraVe Therapeutic Hand Cream for Dry Cracked Hands
CeraVe Therapeutic Hand Cream for Dry Cracked Hands
PHOTO: Amazon

Love recommends CeraVe’s hand cream because it’s packed with hyaluronic acid, a moisturizing molecule that can hold up to 1,000 times its weight in water.

La Roche-Posay Toleriane Double Repair Face Moisturizer ($19.99; amazon.com)

La Roche-Posay Toleriane Double Repair Face Moisturizer
La Roche-Posay Toleriane Double Repair Face Moisturizer
PHOTO: Amazon

“I also love La Roche-Posay Double Repair for dry skin,” says Love. The niacinamide-rich moisturizer has more than 4,000 5-star reviews on Amazon.

Eau Thermale Avène Thermal Spring Water Facial Mist ($18.50; amazon.com)

Eau Thermale Avène Thermal Spring Water Facial Mist
Eau Thermale Avène Thermal Spring Water Facial Mist
PHOTO: Amazon

“I love Avène products for patients with sensitive skin,” says Love, who recommends this face mist to keep your face feeling fresh and moisturized throughout the day.

Eau Thermale Avène Micellar Lotion Cleansing Water ($19.40; amazon.com)

Eau Thermale Avène Micellar Lotion Cleansing Water
Eau Thermale Avène Micellar Lotion Cleansing Water
PHOTO: Amazon

Avène’s Micellar Water is great for removing makeup without stripping the skin of its natural moisture barrier, according to Love.

Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser ($11.90, originally $15.99; amazon.com)

Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser
Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser
PHOTO: Amazon

“Brands like Cetaphil are a staple for the dermatologist,” says Zeichner, who recommends it to patients with sensitive skin. “It has a long heritage of being an effective, well-tolerated and affordable option for our patients.” And we can personally vouch for the greatness of its cleanser, which leaves skin still moisturized after washing in the morning and at night.

Neutrogena Oil-Free Pink Grapefruit Acne Face Wash ($5.96, originally $7.78; amazon.com)

Neutrogena Oil-Free Pink Grapefruit Acne Face Wash
Neutrogena Oil-Free Pink Grapefruit Acne Face Wash
PHOTO: Amazon

“My favorite oily skin cleanser is the Neutrogena Grapefruit Salicylic Acid Wash,” says Love. “The smell just makes me happy.”

Aquaphor Lip Repair Ointment ($3.97; amazon.com)

Aquaphor Lip Repair Ointment
Aquaphor Lip Repair Ointment
PHOTO: Amazon

And if chapped lips season is already well underway for you, Zeichner recommends Aquaphor as a no-frills option for moisturized lips.

Source

Continue Reading

Trending