Taking too long? Close loading screen.
Connect with us

Tech

DJI announces Ronin S 2 and Ronin SC 2 gimbals

Published

on

It’s been well over a month since DJI teased its new products, but today it officially announced two new gimbals — the Ronin S 2 and the smaller Ronin SC 2.

Both three-axis gimbals come with upgrades you’d expect — stronger motors, heavier payloads, lighter materials, but also some software features we haven’t seen yet. Before we get to that, let’s start with the hardware changes on the RS 2.

The more professional gimbal out of the two is now made with carbon fiber and is 1.3lbs lighter than the original Ronin S, weighing in at a total of 2.86lbs. DJI says the RS 2 supports maximum dynamic payload up to 10lbs. It can theoretically hold even heaving rigs, but you probably won’t get ideal performance with that.

The gimbal also comes with a small 1.4-inch touchscreen display that sits right above the joystick. It can be used to show gimbal settings, camera data, and transmit a live feed of what the camera is recording, but its main purpose is so you can use features like active track without attaching your smartphone on top of the camera.

Courtesy of DJI

DJI is also introducing Titan Stabilization Algorithm, a predictive technology which in theory should optimize to your specific shooting style over time and cut down on manual user input when it comes to speed, deadband and acceleration settings. The second new software enhancement is called SuperSmooth and it’s specifically designed for smoothing out movements when shooting with a tighter lens of up to 100mm focal length.

There are a few other changes that will make any filmmakers’ life easier. The follow focus wheel is now located on the front of the handle and sits right above your index finger. Both RS 2 and RSC 2 are now compatible with Arca Swiss & Manfrotto plates. And that same axis can now be fine-tuned with the balancing knob after you have already mounted your camera, which should speed up setup times between shots.

The Ronin SC 2 is a smaller version of the RS 2 built for smaller mirrorless cameras. This year’s updates include a new foldable design and many of the software and hardware features added to the RS 2.

Courtesy of DJI

The gimbal weighs in at 2.65lbs, which is just slightly heavier than its 2.4lbs predecessor. Its stronger motors support a tested payload of up to 6.6lbs. I felt that the original Ronin SC was just a bit underpowered when I tested it last year. This year DJI promises that more popular camera/lens combinations will work better, such as a Panasonic SH1 paired with a fairly heavy 24-70mm lens.

The new foldable design allows for this gimbal to be held in sling mode, which enables shooting very low to the ground, and there’s also a small 1-inch screen right above the handle.

Courtesy of DJI

Both gimbals come with built-in batteries that DJI says last up to 12 hours of use, and both feature a new quick charge function which can give you a total of 2 hours of use in 15 minutes of charge time. In addition to all of the previous preprogrammed filming modes like panorama, timelapse and vertical mode, DJI is adding a new mode called Time Tunnel that captures a hyperlapse while performing a 360 degree roll.

The Ronin S 2 and Ronin SC 2 are available to purchase starting today for $849 and $499 respectively. DJI is also selling a Pro Combo package which includes a phone holder, separate focus motor, RavenEye Image Transmitter and a dedicated carrying case. The RS 2 Pro Combo will set you back $999, while the RSC 2 Pro Combo will cost $739.

Source

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tech

VidCon is planning to return in summer 2021, and will allow people to attend digitally

Published

on

VidCon, an annual convention focused on digital creators, is tentatively planning to return to Anaheim, California next summer if conditions allow, but organizers are preparing to let people attend digitally for the first time.

The new digital option will allow people to purchase tickets for a number of live-streaming and “key fan-focused sessions” for those who don’t or can’t travel to the actual convention. The move comes after VidCon saw success in many of the digital sessions the convention held this year (referred to as VidCon Now) after the COVID-19 pandemic led to organizers deciding to cancel the actual in-person event.

Nearly 1 million people tuned into digital events held by VidCon over the last few months, according to general manager Jim Louderback, adding that nearly half of that audience was streaming from outside the United States.

“We’ve clearly demonstrated that VidCon transcends borders — more than 180 of them to be exact. Our new hybrid digital and IRL model will extend VidCon’s global reach with more new ways to be informed, entertained, and inspired than ever before.”

In order to reach a more international audience, VidCon’s digital portion will also program different panels and sessions in partnership with VidCon Mexico and VidCon Asia. These panels will be created in a country’s native language and will be scheduled for the appropriate time zones, according to a press release.

Alongside VidCon’s new digital plans, the organization is also introducing a rebrand that is meant to focus on all digital creators instead of honing in on YouTubers. This includes making VidCon Now events — those digital panels and sessions that took the place of a physical VidCon this past summer — year-round. VidCon Now, which includes speakers and experts from YouTube, Instagram, Twitch, TikTok, and more, will pick up again on October 27th.

“We started VidCon more than a decade ago to help strengthen and promote the explosion of creativity that was happening online,” co-founder Hank Green said in a press release. “We did that by bringing together the entire ecosystem: the creators who make amazing things, the fans who love them, and the industry that supports them.”

Source

Continue Reading

Tech

Snapchat’s anime lens was a huge hit, Snap confirms

Published

on

Snapchat’s anime filter was used more than 3 billion times in the first week after it was released, Snap said today, confirming what we already knew: it was a huge hit.

The filter, which morphs its subject into an anime character, is just the latest in a line of fun AR lenses from Snapchat that have gone viral and helped drive usage on the platform. During its third quarter, Snapchat had 249 million daily users, up from 238 million last quarter. The company’s revenue was also up to $679 million, a 52 percent increase even as the pandemic chilled ad spending elsewhere.

There are signs that Snap’s growth is more robust than drive-by filter users. The average number of Snaps created each day is up 25 percent year over year, the company said (though it didn’t say exactly how many that is). Time spent watching shows on Snapchat also grew by 50 percent.

Snap called out the success of its AR features, in particular, when highlighting where it saw growth in the longer term. “The adoption of augmented reality is happening faster than we had previously anticipated, and we are working together as a team to execute on the many opportunities in front of us,” Snap CEO Evan Spiegel said in remarks alongside the company’s earnings release for the third quarter of 2020.

Though Snapchat tends to get less attention than other social networks, it’s among the bigger apps out there. Twitter reported having 186 million daily users last quarter, and TikTok reported in August that it had 100 million daily users in the US. (Snapchat has 90 million daily users in all of North America.) It’s still tiny compared to Facebook and its suite of apps, though. Instagram had 500 million daily users when it last provided an updated number in 2018.

Source

Continue Reading

Tech

Synthetaic raises $3.5M to train AI with synthetic data

Published

on

Synthetaic is a startup workign to create data — specifically images — that can be used to train artificial intelligence.

Founder and CEO Corey Jaskolski’s past experience includes work with both National Geographic (where he was recently named Explorer of the Year) and a 3D media startup. In fact, he told me that his time with National Geographic made him aware of the need for more data sets in conservation.

Sound like an odd match? Well, Jaskolski said that he was working on a project that could automatically identify poachers and endangered animals from camera footage, and one of the major obstacles was the fact that there simply aren’t enough existing images of either poachers (who don’t generally appreciate being photographed) or certain endangered animals in the wild to train AI to detect them.

He added that other companies are trying to create synthetic AI training data through 3D worldbuilding (in other words, “building a replica of the world that you want to have an AI learn in”), but in many cases, this approach is prohibitively expensive.

In contrast, the Synthetaic (pronounced “synthetic”) approach combines the work of 3D artists and modelers with technology based on generative adversarial networks, making it far more affordable and scalable, according to Jaskolski.

Synthetaic elephants

Image Credits: Synthetaic

To illustrate the “interplay” between the two halves of Synthetaic’s model, he returned to the example of identifying poachers — the startup’s 3D team could create photorealistic models of an AK 47 (and other weapons), then use adversarial networks to generate hundreds of thousands of images or more showing that model against different backgrounds.

The startup also validates its results after an AI has been trained on Synthetaic’s synthesized images, by testing that AI on real data.

For Synthetaic’s initial projects, Jaskolski said he wanted to partner with organizations doing work that makes the world a better place, including Save the Elephants (which is using the technology to track animal populations) and the University of Michigan (which is developing an AI that can identify different types of brain tumors).

Jaskolski added that Synthetaic customers don’t need any AI expertise of their own, because the company provides an “end-to-end” solution.

The startup announced today that it has raised $3.5 million in seed funding led by Lupa Systems, with participation from Betaworks Ventures and TitletownTech (a partnership between Microsoft and the Green Bay Packers). The startup, which has now raised a total of $4.5 million, is also part of Lupa and Betaworks’ Betalab program of startups doing work that could help “fix the internet.”

Source

Continue Reading

Trending