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Amazon says rising injury rates are due to generous recuperation time

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On Tuesday, Reveal published a major report about rising injury rates at Amazon’s fulfillment warehouses, sourced from leaked internal data and interviews with numerous sources, claiming that Amazon has misled the public about those rates. However, Amazon says it hasn’t “misled anyone” and that Reveal is misinterpreting Amazon’s data.

“The very internal documents [Reveal] claims to have obtained ultimately illustrate one thing—we have a deep focus on the safety of our teams,” the company said in a statement to The Verge.

Reveal’s article illustrates that the rate of serious injuries at Amazon warehouses has increased between 2016 and 2019. But in its response, Amazon disputed what qualifies as a serious injury, arguing that the numbers are higher because the company is more generous in granting recuperation time.

An illustration of serious injuries per 100 workers at Amazon warehouses.
Image: Reveal

Amazon also claims Reveal is “misinformed” about the metric of a serious injury rate in the first place:

Reveal is misinformed regarding an OSHA safety metric that measures days away and restricted or transferred work (known as a DART rate) as something the reporter mistakenly calls a serious incident rate. The reality is that there is no such OSHA or industry “serious incident rate,” and our DART rate is actually supportive of employees as it encourages someone with any type of injury, for example a small strain or sprain, to stay away from work until they’re better.

Reveal never actually uses the phrase “serious incident rate” in its article, though; it seems Amazon is instead referring to Reveal’s use of the term “serious injury rate.” And Reveal managing editor Andy Donohue pushed back on Amazon’s characterization, telling The Verge that the “serious injury rate” phrasing was deliberate: “all we’ve done is removed government acronym jargon — DART — and instead used a phrase that’s more friendly to the reader — ‘serious injury.’”

Donohue also pointed to a Bureau of Labor Statistics website about how to calculate injury incidence rates, which said the formula to calculate DART rate can be used to calculate serious injury rates as well.

Reveal’s article also says that Amazon’s warehouses with robots, which the company has claimed would improve worker safety, actually have higher injury rates than warehouses that don’t. The efficiency of the robots has reportedly increased quotas significantly, meaning workers may be subject to hours of repetitive manual labor that can lead to injury.

Amazon claims it is making improvements for a safer working environment. “We continue to see improvements in injury prevention and reduction through programs focused on improved ergonomics, delivering guided physical and wellness exercises, providing mechanical workstation assistance equipment, improving workstation setup and design, forklift telematics, and forklift guardrails to separate equipment from pedestrians—to name a few,” the company said in its statement.

But Amazon has only piloted some changes to help reduce injury risk, according to Reveal. One that had shown promise (and was recommended by OSHA) involved having workers rotate to other jobs during the day. But “despite the considerable benefits, half of the pilot sites decided to turn off sort rotation during Prime Week,” Reveal quoted from an Amazon safety team report from August 2019.

Amazon also tells The Verge that it has committed more than $1 billion in 2020 to investments in safety, including safety technologies as well as masks, gloves, and enhanced cleaning and sanitation protocols. Presumably, however, most of that is the $800 million the company has committed to COVID-19 safety measures, and it’s unclear how much the company is putting toward other safety needs. The company also says it has more than 5,000 employees on its employee health and safety team.

Donohue tells The Verge that Amazon declined interview requests and did not directly answer Reveal’s questions. “We began requesting an interview on August 19 and sent a list of 35 detailed questions about our findings and data on September 9,” Donohue said. “In response, Amazon provided only a general statement about its safety initiatives, which we incorporated into our story where relevant.“

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Charge Your Phone Wirelessly With 50% off a Multifunctional LED Lamp

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Best Tech DealsBest Tech DealsThe best tech deals from around the web, updated daily.

White Wireless Charge Lamp | $18 | Amazon | Clip coupon + code ABC88699
Black Wireless Charger Lamp | $20 | Amazon | Promo code ABC88699

When you’re ready to turn in for the night, you don’t want to forget to charge your phone— especially if your mobile device doubles as your alarm clock.

With this wireless charger lamp, you can make this crucial step of your nightly routine even easier by just setting your phone on the wireless charging pad and… well, that’s all there is to it!

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Other functions include multiple lighting modes as well as a sleep timer option for auto shut-off of the light after 30 or 60 minutes.

This lamp can be yours in white for $18 if you clip the coupon on Amazon (it’s below the original $40 price) and add promo code ABC88699 at checkout.

You can snag the black version for $20 using the same code—no coupon though, sorry.

Don’t sleep on this deal! Who knows how long stock or the coupon code will last?

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Keep That Hotdish Hot With 65% Off a Luncia Casserole Carrier, Only $11 With Promo Code

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Best Home DealsBest Home DealsThe best home, kitchen, smart home, and automotive deals from around the web, updated daily.

Luncia Double-Decker Dish Carrier | $11 | Amazon | Promo code SDDU9S7F

It has been a long time since the days we could safely have a potluck or other gatherings, but we have a fantastic deal perfect for once those times return. These double-decker Luncia dish carriers can be had for 65% off when you add promo code SDDU9S7F at checkout and clip the coupon on the site (it’s just below the price). These holders fit 9″x 13″ sized baking dishes.

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That means you can insulate and keep two dishes of food warm for only $11 instead of $30. What’s more, your Luncia carrier will arrive by Christmas if you order today as a Prime member.

Just add promo code SDDU9S7F and clip the 5% off coupon to bring the price down to $11 for the blue or the grey option.

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Grab this offer while it’s still around!


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Conquer Your Pup’s Dander and Fur With $700 Off a Cobalt or Charcoal Bobsweep PetHair Plus Robot Vacuum

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Best Home DealsBest Home DealsThe best home, kitchen, smart home, and automotive deals from around the web, updated daily.

Bobsweep PetHair Plus Robot Vacuum & Mop (Cobalt) | $200 | Best Buy

Bobsweep PetHair Plus Robot Vacuum & Mop (Charcoal) | $200 | Best Buy

Allergies can be bad enough as the seasons change. Don’t let pet hair and dander add to that by vacuuming it up early and often. That chore is easier said than done— unless you have a robot vacuum to do the work for you. This lovely bright cobalt Bobsweep PetHair Plus robot vacuum and mop, only $200 today at Best Buy seems like an ideal option. That’s a whopping $700 off, by the way.

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You can get the same deal for the charcoal version of the robot vac, too. This model is not only specially made for picking up pet hair, it self docks and charges when it’s finished with the work.

It also comes with a mop attachment, so it can take care of those kitchen floors for you as well. Grab it while it’s still available for this fantastic price!

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