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8 Best Amazon Prime Day Kitchen Deals That Bon Appétit Editors Want 2020

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Buy It: Zojirushi NS-TSC10 5½-Cup (Uncooked) Micom Rice Cooker and Warmer, $105 (normally $192)


BA editor Christina Chaey’s tri-ply Calphalon saucepan makes solo cooking a breeze, but if you’re setting up your own kitchen for the first time (or know someone who is and could use a thoughtful gift), consider springing for this entire set. You’ll get the saucepan plus a stockpot, a sauté pan, and both a 10-inch and an 8-inch frying pan—everything you need in one fell swoop.

Buy It: Calphalon Premier Stainless-Steel Pots and Pans 8-Piece Cookware Set, $222 (normally $366)


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Photo by Chelsie Craig

A Vitamix under $200 is a mythical beast, but today it can be yours. This pre-owned, refurbished Vitamix Explorian comes at a gentler price than the 5200s used in the BA Test Kitchen (although the 5200’s seven-year warranty is not included). The container on this model holds 64 ounces just like the 5200, but it’s shorter and squatter for easier storage. 

Buy It: Vitamix Explorian Blender, Professional-Grade, 64 oz. Container, (Renewed), $179 (normally $350)


Bundt cakes are what you bake when you don’t have time for the frivolity of buttercream and sprinkles: “Here, this is technically still cake. Enjoy.” But a dramatic cake pan like this Nordic Ware Lotus Bundt pan can elevate even the humblest of bakes into something festive and showy—no frosting required.

Buy It: Nordic Ware Lotus Bundt Pan, $23 (normally $29)


Chef and author Amy Chaplin counts several BA editors among her fans, including Basically editor Sarah Jampel. Chaplin’s first cookbook, At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen, won a James Beard Award in the Vegetable Focused and Vegetarian category and deserves a spot on your shelf. 

Buy It: At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen: Celebrating the Art of Eating Well, $23 (normally $40)


8 Best Amazon Prime Day Kitchen Deals That Bon Apptit Editors Want 2020
Photo by Alex Lau

Gaze into the grease stains on my old, warped baking sheets, and you’ll soon learn your fortune. Mine is that I’m getting a set of Nordic Ware baker’s quarter-sheet pans, one of BA editor Christina Chaey’s top five most useful home kitchen tools. At—you guessed it, Mathletes—half the size of a half-sheet pan, a quarter-sheet pan is perfect for those tiny tasks, like toasting nuts and seeds, reheating a slice of pizza, or baking off two balls of frozen cookie dough.

Buy It: Nordic Ware Natural Aluminum Commercial Baker’s Quarter-Sheet, 2-Pack $18 (normally $28)


We prefer the quality of loose leaf tea over bagged tea, but it’s hard to argue with the convenience of plopping a sachet into a cup of hot water. It wasn’t until BA editor Meryl Rothstein was gifted an extra-fine tea strainer that she became a convert; it’s less finicky to fill than a tea ball and the lid doubles as a saucer, so there are no drips or spills.

Buy It: Yoassi Extra-Fine Stainless-Steel Tea Infuser Mesh Strainer with Double Handles $6 (normally $8)

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Pull-Apart Breadsticks

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When a recipe calls for sopping up sauce, these breadsticks are your sopper-uppers of choice. Topped with Kalamata olives, garlic, red onion, and Calabrian chiles, they’re also just as good on their own—serve them straight from the oven and let everyone rip them off with their hands. This recipe comes from Bryan Ford and is based on his Master Bread Dough. Feel free to customize them with whatever finely chopped toppings you desire; just be sure to press them into the dough so that they stick.

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Fridge Clean-Out Nabe With Mushroom Dashi

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Pour dashi into a 1.5–2-qt. donabe or small saucepan and stir in mirin and soy sauce; season with salt. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Add squash and turnips, cover, and cook until vegetables are almost completely tender, 5–7 minutes. Uncover; add greens, tofu, white and pale green parts of scallions, and reserved mushrooms. Cover and cook until greens are wilted, tofu is warmed through, and squash and turnips are tender, about 2 minutes.

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One Pot, One Million(ish) Options

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Every week, Bon Appetit associate editor Christina Chaey writes about what she’s cooking right now. Pro tip: If you sign up for the newsletter, you’ll get the scoop before everyone else.

Dear Healthyish friends,

From late October to early April, one piece of cookware takes up permanent residence on my stovetop, quietly burbling up hot pots and soups on cold nights. People message me on Instagram whenever I post photos of my donabe: What is it? (A Japanese earthenware pot used for cooking and serving.) Where did I get it? (Toiro Kitchen in L.A.) What do I make in it? (Everything!)

At a basic level, a donabe is a pot that just happens to be pretty enough to double as a striking serving piece. High-quality versions have thick walls that effectively retain heat and are especially good for gently cooking the vegetable-heavy meals I want constantly this time of year.

When I’m short on time, I opt for a quick nabe, or hot pot, which starts with a light broth that I season with good soy sauce and mirin. My broth of choice is often dashi, an essential Japanese stock of dried bonito flakes, kombu, and water that gives dishes like miso soup their subtle briny flavor. When I need dinner to be even more hands-off, I’ll make a vegan mushroom dashi by placing dried shiitakes and a strip of kombu in a big jar of water and refrigerating it all overnight. The resulting golden broth is savory and lightly earthy. It lacks the body of a lipsmacking chicken stock, which is exactly why I like it: A bowlful leaves me feeling satisfied but not weighed down.

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Photo by Emma Fishman, Food Styling by Rebecca Jurkevich 

When warmed in the donabe, the dashi creates a small hot tub environment for whatever kitchen-sink assortment of vegetables and protein I’m cooking. Some days I may have peeled, seeded, and sliced kabocha or butternut squash already prepped and ready to drop into the simmering broth. While the thick squash starts cooking away, I’ll quickly tear greens and mushrooms, slice tofu, and boil a little pot of noodles like soba to slip in right before I’m ready to eat. In those few minutes I enter an almost flow-like state, moving seamlessly from cutting board to stove; dinner is ready in minutes.

Though this recipe is a nabe I make often, it’s meant to be a guideline, not scripture. That’s the beauty of this style of cooking: Each rendition is slightly different from the one before. But no matter how much you mix it up, you’re guaranteed a meal that’s vibrant and delicious, nourishing yet light, and that leaves you feeling good inside. If there’s one thing I want you to take away from this, it’s that you can absolutely riff without a recipe. And that you should have a donabe of your own, of course.

May your weekend be broth-filled,

Christina Chaey
Associate editor

Make the recipe:

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